Category Archives: Amateur Korean Sociology

Teaching Boys; or, “I’m Glad It’s Thursday Afternoon.”

This past week has, undoubtedly, been the most exhausting, most infuriating week teaching in Korea. The students have been extraordinarily rowdy, disrespectful, and refuse to listen, even to the Korean teachers when they speak Korean. We’ve had fights, kids crying, … Continue reading

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English as a Developing Lingua Franca

I’m currently employed as an English teacher. My main job is simply to speak in my native tongue, to accustom my students to spoken English. I make lesson plans, but they’re relatively simple. I don’t grade papers or give out … Continue reading

Posted in Amateur Korean Sociology, Language | 3 Comments

Adaptation; or, I’ve Been In Korea For Only 3 Weeks?(!)

I arrived in Korea on the 17th of February, exactly 3 weeks ago. 21 days. But being in Korea already feels normal, like I’ve been living here for months. And that’s despite the fact that I still only know about … Continue reading

Posted in Amateur Korean Sociology, Life in Chungju | 6 Comments

The Intersection of Korean Architecture, Religion, & Economics

I never owned a camera in the US. Never felt a need for one. But here in Korea, everything is different, and interesting, and seems deserving of a photo (or two, or three…). I’ve probably taken 150 photos in the … Continue reading

Posted in Amateur Korean Sociology, Steeples! | 8 Comments

Korean Car Ownership

Chungju is, geographically, a tiny city. I pretty much walked across it, both north-to-south and east-to-west today, and it took me about 3-4 hours. It’s compact, but ‘tall’: most people live in huge 30-storey apartment blocks. 210,000 people are packed … Continue reading

Posted in Amateur Korean Sociology, Egregious Existential Musings | Leave a comment